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Artisan style SEED breads {3 recipes}


Our heart health can only benefit from the addition of nutritional seeds.
Quinoa, wild rice, flax or chia blend perfectly into delectable artisan style breads.



As usual, as our year has begun, we generally tend to go overboard on resolutions.
I, for one stopped making them, however, subconsciously, I do tend to go healthier.
Pants have been affectionately hugging and legging stitches are showing more wear.
Hmmm…guess a few changes will get made no matter what I think of resolutions.

I do find what usually works is to extract an element of health in what I make.
Therefore, it makes me feel that eating bread is not so bad after all.


Yes, carbs seem to be all the rage and unfortunately not in a good way.
So much talk about the Keto diet…what happened to balanced eating?
Outside of intolerance or allergies from eating bread...let's not make it the villain.

How about we all compromise with a great tummy smile.
While making other efforts to be kinder to our waistlines…
why not also take advantage of the mood enhancement from satisfactory bread.


Artisan bread has been part of my Mediterranean upbringing...
and, it is after all still a sought after lifestyle for many who look and feel great.

Making bread was inspired by my trip to Paris where the masters have their stamp of pride.



Let's just consciously re-vamp the word moderation into a meaningful philosophy.
Too many resolutions and restrictions can only make us feel deprived…not a solution.

Here are a few breads that I've worked on over the years.
The first bread is super easy to put together, while the others tend to take a little longer to make.
No matter which one you decide to try, I can assure you, they are well worth the effort.
I just can't promise that you'll have enough willpower to stop at one slice.




Whole wheat Flaxseed Molasses
bread loaf
A very easy bread to make

makes 1 - (5x9 inch) / (13x23cm) bread loaf
or a (4x8 inch) / (10x20cm) 


PRINTER VERSION

INGREDIENTS:
(American / Metric measures)

WET mix:
. 1-1/2 cups (375ml) warm water (~95F/ 35C)
. 1 Tbsp. (15ml) fancy molasses
. 2-1/4 tsps. (1 envelope) active dry yeast 'Traditional'
DRY mix:
. 3-1/2 cups (450g) Whole Wheat flour
. 2 Tbsps. (30ml) ground flaxseed (or chia seed)
. 2 tsps. (10ml) sea salt



PREPARATION:

1. Water-Sweet-YEAST mix: 
In a medium sized measuring cup, pour the warm water (~95F/ 35C).  Add to it the molasses and yeast.  Give it a good whisk to dissolve. Lightly cover with plastic and place it into a draft-free area like a turned off oven.  Let the yeast foam and activate for about 5 minutes.
2. Lightly oil the loaf pan.  Cut a parchment paper to line only the longest length of the loaf pan.
. DOUGH: 
3. Place the flour, flaxseed and salt into the mixing bowl of a stand mixer.  Use the dough attachment and adjust to a medium speed (#2 for most).
4. Start whirling the flour mix before very slowly pouring the yeast mix through the top spout.
5. The dough is ready pretty quickly as it pulls back from the sides of the bowl and forms a ball.  Let the machine run for another 3 minutes. 
6. Place the dough into the pan and lightly cover with an oiled plastic wrap.  Then, cover with a cloth and place into a draft-free place.  Leave it to rise as it doubles for about 1 hour.
7. Pre-heat the oven to 400F/200C/Gas6.  Remove both the cloth and plastic wrap.  BAKE in the center of the oven for 40 minutes...or  (45 minutes if using a 4x8 inch /10x20cm pan). 
9. Remove the bread from the oven and let it rest for barely 5 minutes before releasing it from the pan.  Let it cool on a rack for about 1 hour before slicing.

***




Quinoa Oatmeal Honey 
bread loaves

Note: Has a 3 hour rising period plus 45 minutes baking time.

yields 2 loaves:  5-1/2 x 8-1/2 inch  

PRINTER VERSION


INGREDIENTS:
(American measures)
               
. 2 cups cooked, Red Quinoa*
loose packed, room temperature
DRY MIX:
. 3-3/4 cups All-Purpose flour
. 1 cup quick cooking Oats
. 2 Tbsps. ground flaxseed (or chia seed)
. 1-1/2 tsps. sea salt
WET MIX:
. 1 cup warm water (~95F)
. 2 tsps. active dry 'traditional' yeast
….
. 1/8 cup grapeseed oil
. 1/8 cup e.v. olive oil
. 1/2 cup mild Honey
. 1 Tbsp. Dijon mustard

* Rule of thumb: a scant 1/2 cup of uncooked Quinoa renders about 2 cups cooked and loosely packed.
.  Cooking method: Thoroughly rinse the Quinoa and drain.  Then, in a small saucepan, boil 1-1/2 cups of water.  Add in the Quinoa seeds.  When there is a surface boil, lower the heat to LOW-MEDIUM and cook for 12 minutes.  The water will have mostly evaporated by now.  Shut the heat.  Cover and let it rest for 10 minutes.  Then, fluff with a fork.  Let it come to room temperature or refrigerate if making recipe later.


PREPARATION:
Note: This bread can also be mixed by hand within a very large bowl.  

DRY MIX:
1. In a stand mixer with its dough hook, place all the DRY ingredients.  Set aside.
WET MIX:
2. Yeast liquid:  In a medium sized measuring cup, pour the warm water (~95F) and whisk in the yeast. Cover with plastic and let it activate for 5 minutes. 
3. In another container, measure out the remaining wet ingredients.  Set Aside.
. ASSEMBLY:
4. Back to the stand mixer, add in the Quinoa and start whirling at a moderate speed (#2 for most machines).  Then, as the machine whirls, slowly pour in the WET mix finishing with the yeast liquid.  Whirl for about 2 minutes as the dough releases itself from the walls of the bowl and starts coming together into a rather smooth and elastic dough.  




...Proofing the dough: 
5. Place the dough into a generously oiled large bowl. Then, cover with a tight plastic wrap and a cloth for 90 minutes in a draft free zone.
6...Meanwhile: Lightly grease the two loaf pans and place a parchment paper fitting on the longest part of the pan with an overhang.  Set aside.
7. After the initial rising has passed, the dough will have doubled.  Punch it down to release its gas.  Divide the dough in two and shape the units to fit the prepared pans.   Flatten lightly to fill the edges.  Set them aside in a draft-free area.  Cover each pan with a lightly oiled plastic and then cover both pans with a cloth for a period of another 90 minutes to have the dough rise once more.  Set them on the surface of a closed stovetop during this time.
8. Meanwhile, about 30 minutes before the rising time is up, start pre-heating the oven at 350F and position the rack in the middle of the oven.
9. When the dough has doubled in bulk, remove the plastics and place the breads to BAKE for 45 minutes.   Afterwards, allow the breads to cool in the pans for 15 minutes before removing them to a rack to properly cool at room temperature before slicing.  Tip: this bread slices much better after hours of cooling down.


***


Wild Rice Honey Walnut Raisin 
round breads

Note: Has a 3 hour rising period plus a 45 minute baking time.

yields 2 small round breads

PRINTER VERSION

INGREDIENTS:
(American measures)   

DRY MIX:
. 3-3/4 cups All-Purpose flour
. 1 tsp. sea salt
. 1/2 cup raisins (or other dried fruit)
. 1/2 cup raw walnuts, coarsely chopped
. 1 cup cooked, Wild Rice*, 
loose packed, room temperature
YEAST MIX:
. 1 cup water
. 1/2 cup evaporated 2% milk
. 1/8 cup mild Honey
. 1-1/2 tsps. active dry 'traditional' yeast
….
. 1 Tbsp. e.v. Olive oil

* Rule of thumb: a heaping 1/4 cup of uncooked Wild rice renders about 1 cup.
.  Cooking method: Rinse the rice.  Then, in a medium saucepan, boil 2-1/2 cups of water.  Add in the rice.  
When there is a surface boil, lower the heat to LOW-MEDIUM and cook for 25 minutes.  
Shut the heat.  Cover and let it rest for a little while.  Drain and fluff with a fork.



PREPARATION:
Note: This bread can also be mixed by hand within a very large bowl. 

DRY MIX:
1. In a stand mixer with its dough hook, place the flour and salt.  Set aside.
YEAST MIX:
2. In a small pot, warm up the water, milk and honey on LOW-MEDIUM heat and stir occasionally.  When the thermometer reaches 95F, immediately remove it from the heat.  Add the yeast, stir and let rest for 10 minutes.
. ASSEMBLY:
3. Back to the stand mixer, start whirling at the #2 speed while slowly pouring in half the Yeast liquid mix.   Stop the machine and add in the raisins, walnuts and rice.  Continue whirling and pour in the remaining liquid.  Last, add the oil.  Continue kneading for another 2 minutes as the dough comes together into a rather smooth and elastic dough. 
...Proofing the dough: 
4. Place the dough into a generously oiled large bowl.  Then, cover with a tight plastic wrap and a cloth for 90 minutes in a draft free zone.
5. After the initial rising, the dough will have doubled.  Punch it down to release its gas.  Divide the dough and shape into 2 round units to then place them on a parchment lined pan.   Cover them with a lightly oiled plastic and a cloth for a period of another 90 minutes to have the dough rise once more.  Set them on top of a closed stovetop during this time.
6. Meanwhile, about 30 minutes before the rising time is up, start pre-heating the oven at 350F and position the rack in the middle of the oven.
7. When the dough has doubled in bulk, remove the plastics and place the breads to BAKE for 45 minutes.  Then, remove them from the oven and transfer the breads onto racks to properly cool at room temperature before slicing.  Tip: this bread slices much better after hours of cooling down.






 Admittedly, this might not be the way I initially thought of starting my first post of the new year, however, a statement needed to be shared. 
I, for one, rather emphasize moderation and living my best life.
I also believe that a delectable, nutritional slice of bread is just the ticket to keep on a healthful track.

Long live heart healthy carbs and Happy New Year.

Flavourful wishes,
Foodessa

Comments ... ??? ... or suggestions ... write me :o)
Claudia at:  foodessa [at] gmail [dot] com

Go HERE for more SAVOURY creations.













Please take note on how I bake and cook...
Here’s a 101 of sorts to make sure that there are no disappointments when trying my creations.  
Also...just so you know...feel free to increase the salt and sweet factor since I'm not high on either of them ;o)

. Use DRY cup measurements for...you guessed it...all DRY ingredients.
Anything DRY gets measured by spooning the overfilled ingredient (never shake the cup) and then level off with a flat edged tool.  Exception...Brown sugar should be packed in and leveled.
. Use LIQUID cup measurements for...all LIQUIDS that cannot be leveled like for example butter, yogurt...etc.  Measure the liquids at eye level to avoid overdoing what the recipe truly needs.
OVENS are unfortunately not created equal.  Mine is so old that it has reached many degrees off it's norm.  It's really worth investing a few dollars to test yours with an appropriate oven thermometer.  You'd be surprised how many ovens I've heard about not being where they should have been.  Before you lose any more ingredients and much time preparing a new recipe...run to the store...you'll thank me later.